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Big Horn Medicine Wheel, Lovell, Wyoming
110 Reasons To Visit the USA
1. Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
          Grand Canyon National Park, in Arizona, is home to much of the immense Grand Canyon, with its layered bands of red rock revealing millions of years of geological history. Viewpoints include Mather Point, Yavapai Observation Station and architect Mary Colter’s Lookout Studio and her Desert View Watchtower. Lipan Point, with wide views of the canyon and Colorado River, is a popular, especially at sunrise and sunset.The Grand Canyon National Park is a hugely popular national park destination in United States.The park offers rim to rim hiking, donkey rides, and whitewater rafting.
2. Niagara Falls, New York
           Niagara Falls State Park is home to over 400 acres of lush landscape and wildlife, the beautiful falls themselves, and many famous attractions. Niagara Falls State Park offers a breathtaking view of one of nature’s marvels and an experience that will last a lifetime. Niagara Falls State Park is the oldest state park in the U.S. Established in 1885 as the Niagara Reservation, it was the first of several such reservations that eventually became the cornerstones to the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation.
3. Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
           Yellowstone National Park is a nearly 3,500-sq.-mile wilderness recreation area atop a volcanic hot spot. Mostly in Wyoming, the park spreads into parts of Montana and Idaho too. Yellowstone features dramatic canyons, alpine rivers, lush forests, hot springs and gushing geysers, including its most famous, Old Faithful. It's also home to hundreds of animal species, including bears, wolves, bison, elk and antelope.
4. Glacier, Montana
          Glacier National Park is a 1,583-sq.-mi. wilderness area in Montana's Rocky Mountains, with glacier-carved peaks and valleys running to the Canadian border. It's crossed by the mountainous Going-to-the-Sun Road. Among more than 700 miles of hiking trails, it has a route to photogenic Hidden Lake. Other activities include backpacking, cycling and camping. Diverse wildlife ranges from mountain goats to grizzly bears.
5. Crater Lake, Oregon
           Crater Lake National Park is in the Cascade Mountains of southern Oregon. It’s known for its namesake Crater Lake, formed by the now-collapsed volcano, Mount Mazama. Wizard Island is a cinder cone near the western edge of the lake. The Rim Drive, a road surrounding the lake, offers views of the park’s volcanic formations. The park’s numerous trails include Sun Notch, with views of the Phantom Ship, a small island.
Central Park, New York City
6. The French Quarter, New Orleans
          The French Quarter is the city’s historic heart, famous for its vibrant nightlife and colorful buildings with cast-iron balconies. Crowd-pleasing Bourbon Street features jazz clubs, Cajun eateries and raucous bars serving potent cocktails. Quieter streets lead to the French Market, with gourmet food and local crafts, and to Jackson Square where street performers entertain in front of soaring St. Louis Cathedral.
7. Salem, Massachusetts
          Salem is a historic coastal city in Essex County, Massachusetts located in the North Shore region. It was settled in 1626 and was one of the most significant seaports in early American history. Salem is a residential and tourist area that is home to the House of Seven Gables, Salem State University, Pioneer Village, the Salem Maritime National Historic Site, Salem Willows Park, and the Peabody Essex Museum. It features historic residential neighborhoods in the Federal Street District and the Charter Street Historic District
8. Theodore Roosevelt, North Dakota
          Theodore Roosevelt National Park is an American national park comprising three geographically separated areas of badlands in western North Dakota. The park was named for U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt. The park covers 70,446 acres (110.072 sq mi; 28,508 ha; 285.08 km2) of land in three sections: the North Unit, the South Unit, and the Elkhorn Ranch Unit.
9. Yosemite National Park
          Yosemite National is an American national park located in the western Sierra Nevada of Central California, bounded on the southeast by Sierra National Forest and on the northwest by Stanislaus National Forest.
10. Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado
           Mesa Verde National Park is in southwest Colorado. It's known for its well-preserved Ancestral Puebloan cliff dwellings, notably the huge Cliff Palace. The Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum has exhibits on the ancient Native American culture.
The Badlands, South Dakota
11. New York City, New York
           New York City comprises 5 boroughs sitting where the Hudson River meets the Atlantic Ocean. At its core is Manhattan, a densely populated borough that’s among the world’s major commercial, financial and cultural centers. Its iconic sites include skyscrapers such as the Empire State Building and sprawling Central Park. Broadway theater is staged in neon-lit Times Square.New York City has been described as the cultural, financial,and media capital of the world,  and exerts a significant impact upon commerce, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, art, fashion, and sports. New York is also the most densely populated major city in the United States.
12. White Sands National Monument, New Mexico
           White Sands National Monument is in the northern Chihuahuan Desert in the U.S. state of New Mexico. It's known for its dramatic landscape of rare white gypsum sand dunes. Trails through the dunes include the raised Interdune Boardwalk and the Dune Life Nature Trail, dotted with interpretive exhibits on wildlife and other features.
13. The Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco, California
           The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the one-mile-wide (1.6 km) strait connecting San Francisco Bay and the Pacific Ocean.
14. St. Augustine, Florida
           St. Augustine is a city on the northeast coast of Florida. It lays claim to being the oldest city in the U.S., and is known for its Spanish colonial architecture as well as Atlantic Ocean beaches like sandy St. Augustine Beach and tranquil Crescent Beach. Anastasia State Park is a protected wildlife sanctuary.
15. Zion National Park
           Zion National Park is an American national park located in southwestern Utah near the town of Springdale. A prominent feature of the 229-square-mile (590 km2) park is Zion Canyon, which is 15 miles (24 km) long and up to 2,640 ft (800 m) deep. The canyon walls are reddish and tan-colored Navajo Sandstone eroded by the North Fork of the Virgin River. Zion National Park is a southwest Utah nature preserve distinguished by Zion Canyon’s steep red cliffs. Zion Canyon Scenic Drive cuts through its main section, leading to forest trails along the Virgin River. The river flows to the Emerald Pools, which have waterfalls and a hanging garden. 
16. Las Vegas Strip, Nevada
           Las Vegas, officially the City of Las Vegas and often known simply as Vegas, is the 28th-most populated city in the United States, the most populated city in the state of Nevada, and the county seat of Clark County.
17. Badlands, South Dakota
           Badlands National Park is in South Dakota. Its dramatic landscapes span layered rock formations, steep canyons and towering spires. Bison, bighorn sheep and prairie dogs inhabit its sprawling grasslands. The Badlands Loop Road (Highway 240) winds past scenic lookouts.
Mt. Rushmore, South Dakota
18. Highway One, California
           State Route 1 is a major north–south state highway that runs along most of the Pacific coastline of the U.S. state of California. At a total of just over 656 miles, it is the longest state route in California.
19. Ellis Island, New Jersey & New York
           Ellis Island is a federally owned island in New York Harbor that contains a museum and former immigration inspection station. As the United States' busiest immigrant inspection station from 1892 to 1954, it processed approximately 12 million immigrants to the country through the Port of New York and New Jersey.
20. Joshua Tree, California
           Joshua Tree National Park is a vast protected area in southern California. It's characterized by rugged rock formations and stark desert landscapes. Named for the region’s twisted, bristled Joshua trees, the park straddles the cactus-dotted Colorado Desert and the Mojave Desert, which is higher and cooler. Keys View looks out over the Coachella Valley. Hiking trails weave through the boulders of Hidden Valley.
21. Selma, Alabama
           Selma is a city in and the county seat of Dallas County, in the Black Belt region of south central Alabama and extending to the west. Located on the banks of the Alabama River, the city has a population of 20,756 as of the 2010 census. About 80% of the population is African-American.
22. Arches National Park, Utah
          Arches National Park lies north of Moab in the state of Utah. Bordered by the Colorado River in the southeast, it’s known as the site of more than 2,000 natural sandstone arches, such as the massive, red-hued Delicate Arch in the east. Long, thin Landscape Arch stands in Devils Garden to the north. Other geological formations include Balanced Rock, towering over the desert landscape in the middle of the park.
23. American Samoa
           American Samoa is a U.S. territory covering 7 South Pacific islands and atolls. Tutuila, the largest island, is home to the capital Pago Pago, whose natural harbor is framed by volcanic peaks including 1,716-ft.-high Rainmaker Mountain. Divided between the islands Tutuila, Ofu and Ta‘ū, the National Park of American Samoa highlights the territory's tropical scenery with rainforests, beaches and reefs.
24. Acadia, Maine
          Acadia National Park is a 47,000-acre Atlantic coast recreation area primarily on Maine's Mount Desert Island. Its landscape is marked by woodland, rocky beaches and glacier-scoured granite peaks such as Cadillac Mountain, the highest point on the United States’ East Coast. Among the wildlife are moose, bear, whales and seabirds.
25. Mammoth Cave, Kentucky
           Mammoth Cave National Park is an American national park in central Kentucky, encompassing portions of Mammoth Cave, the longest cave system known in the world.
Las Vegas Strip, Nevada
25. Nashville, Tennessee
           Nashville is the capital of the U.S. state of Tennessee and home to Vanderbilt University. Legendary country music venues include the Grand Ole Opry House, home of the famous “Grand Ole Opry” stage and radio show. The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum and historic Ryman Auditorium are Downtown, as is the District, featuring honky-tonks with live music and the Johnny Cash Museum, celebrating the singer's life.
 
26. North Cascades, Washington
          North Cascades National Park is in northern Washington State. It’s a vast wilderness of conifer-clad mountains, glaciers and lakes. The North Cascades Highway passes viewpoints and leads to trails such as the steep Thunder Creek Trail. Boats dot Ross Lake. The remote community of Stehekin lies at the northern tip of deep Lake Chelan. The park shelters grizzly bears and gray wolves, plus more than 200 bird species.
27. Redwoods, California
          The Redwood National and State Parks (RNSP) are a complex of several state and national parks located in the United States, along the coast of northern California. Comprising Redwood National Park (established 1968) and California's Del Norte Coast, Jedediah Smith, and Prairie Creek Redwoods State Parks (dating from the 1920s), the combined RNSP contain 139,000 acres (560 km2),[3] and feature old-growth temperate rainforests.
28. Voyageurs, Minnesota
          Voyageurs National Park is in northern Minnesota, near the Canadian border. It covers a vast area and is known for its forests, waterways and huge, island-dotted Rainy, Kabetogama and Namakan lakes. The Ellsworth Rock Gardens, created by artist Jack Ellsworth, are a series of abstract sculptures on a terraced outcrop. The remote Kettle Falls area has a dam and a red-roofed hotel, both from the early 20th century.
29. Denali, Alaska
          Denali is the highest mountain peak in North America, with a summit elevation of 20,310 feet above sea level. With a topographic prominence of 20,156 feet and a topographic isolation of 4,629 miles, Denali is the third most prominent and third most isolated peak on Earth, after Mount Everest and Aconcagua.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
30. Big Bend, Texas
           Big Bend National Park is in southwest Texas and includes the entire Chisos mountain range and a large swath of the Chihuahuan Desert. The Ross Maxwell Scenic Drive leads to the ruins of Sam Nail Ranch, now home to desert wildlife. The Santa Elena Canyon, carved by the Rio Grande, features steep limestone cliffs. Langford Hot Springs, near the Mexican border, has pictographs and the foundations of an old bathhouse.
31. Biscayne, Florida
           Key Biscayne is a Florida town on a barrier island across the Rickenbacker Causeway from Miami. It lies between 2 large parks—Crandon Park and Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park—each with long, sheltered beaches, mangroves and tropical forest inhabited by birdlife, butterflies and loggerhead turtles. The latter is home to the 19th-century Cape Florida Lighthouse.
32. Cuyahoga Valley, Ohio
          Cuyahoga Valley National Park lies along the Cuyahoga River between the Ohio cities of Cleveland and Akron. The Ohio and Erie Canal Towpath Trail is a restored section of the canal's original towpath. In the park’s north, the Canal Exploration Center details the 19th-century waterway’s history. Towering Brandywine Falls is one of several waterfalls. The Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad runs through the park.
          
Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco
Theodore Roosevelt Park, North Dakota
33. Shenandoah, Virginia
           Visit Virginia's Shenandoah Valley and discover unique attractions, small-town charm, national parks, outdoor adventures & more! Epic Experiences await you!
34. Skagit Valley Tulip, Washington
           The Skagit Valley Tulip Festival is a Tulip festival in the Skagit Valley of Washington state, United States. It is held annually in the spring, April 1 to April 30.
35. Devils Tower, Wyoming
           Devils Tower is a butte, possibly laccolithic, composed of igneous rock in the Bear Lodge Ranger District of the Black Hills, near Hulett and Sundance in Crook County, northeastern Wyoming, above the Belle Fourche River. It rises 1,267 feet above the Belle Fourche River, standing 867 feet from summit to base.
36. Mendenhall Glacier Caves, Alaska
           A glacier cave under Mendenhall Glacier. Mendenhall Glacier (also Sitaantaagu) is a glacier about 13.6 miles (21.9 km) long located in Mendenhall Valley, about 12 miles (19 km) from downtown Juneau in the southeast area of the U.S. state of Alaska.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
37. The Wave, Arizona
           The Wave is a sandstone rock formation located in Arizona, United States, near its northern border with Utah. The formation is situated on the slopes of the Coyote Buttes in the Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness of the Colorado Plateau.
38. Savannah, Georgia
           Savannah, a coastal Georgia city, is separated from South Carolina by the Savannah River. It’s known for manicured parks, horse-drawn carriages and antebellum architecture. Its historic district is filled with cobblestoned squares and parks such as Forsyth Park shaded by oak trees covered with Spanish moss. At the center of this picturesque district is the landmark, Gothic-Revival Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist.
39. Lake Tahoe, California/Nevada
           The lake was formed about two million years ago as part of the Lake Tahoe Basin, with the modern extent being shaped during the ice ages. It is known for the clarity of its water and the panorama of surrounding mountains on all sides. The area surrounding the lake is also referred to as Lake Tahoe, or simply Tahoe.
40. Bryce Canyon, Utah
           Bryce Canyon National Park is an American located in southwestern . The major feature of the park is Bryce Canyon, which despite its name, is not a canyon, but a collection of giant natural amphitheaters along the eastern side of the 
41. Haiku Stair, Oahu, Hawaii
           The Haʻikū Stairs, also known as the Stairway to Heaven or Haʻikū Ladder, is a steep hiking trail on the island of Oʻahu, Hawaii. The total 3,922 steps span along Oahu's Ko'olau mountain range. "Haiku" does not refer to the Japanese poetry genre. The area is named "Haʻikū" after the Kahili flower.
42. Gateway Arch, Missouri
           The Gateway Arch is a 630-foot (192 m) monument in St. Louis, Missouri, United States. Clad in stainless steel and built in the form of a weighted catenary arch,  it is the world's tallest arch, the tallest man-made monument in the Western Hemisphere, and Missouri's tallest accessible building.
43. Whitaker Point, Arkansas
           Popular, scenic hiking route leading to a unique, rocky outcrop overlooking lush mountains.
44. Northern Lights, Alaska
           The most reliable chances to see Alaska's northern lights (also known as the Aurora Borealis) are in Fairbanks, and above the Arctic Circle. ... If you visit Alaska in November, December or January, you will experience a very short period of daylight providing a unique experience in the high northern hemisphere.
45. Central Park, New York
           Central Park is an urban park in Manhattan, New York City, located between the Upper West Side and the Upper East Side. Central Park is the most visited urban park in the United States, with an estimated 37.5–38 million visitors annually, and one of the most filmed locations in the world.
Smithsonian Institutions, DC
46. Oneonta Gorge, Oregon
           The Oneonta Gorge is a scenic gorge located in the Columbia River Gorge area of the American state of Oregon. The U.S. Forest Service has designated it as a botanical area because of the unique aquatic and woodland plants that grow there.
47. Antelope Canyon, Arizona
           Antelope Canyon is a slot canyon in the American Southwest, on Navajo land east of Page, Arizona. It includes two separate, scenic slot canyon sections, referred to as Upper Antelope Canyon, and Lower Antelope Canyon.
48. Everglades, Florida
           Everglades National Park is a 1.5-million-acre wetlands preserve on the southern tip of the U.S. state of Florida. Often compared to a grassy, slow-moving river, the Everglades is made up of coastal mangroves, sawgrass marshes and pine flatwoods that are home to hundreds of animal species. Among the Everglades' abundant wildlife are the endangered leatherback turtle, Florida panther and West Indian manatee.
49. Death Valley, California/Nevada
           Death Valley is a desert valley located in Eastern California, in the northern Mojave Desert bordering the Great Basin Desert. It is one of the hottest places in the world along with deserts in the Middle East.
 
50. Horsebend, Arizona
          Horseshoe Bend is located 5 miles (8.0 km) downstream from the Glen Canyon Dam and Lake Powell within Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, about 4 miles (6.4 km) southwest of Page. It is accessible via hiking a 1.5-mile (2.4 km) round trip from a parking area just off U.S. Route 89 within southwestern Page.
51. Rocky Mountains, Colorado
           Rocky Mountain National Park in northern Colorado spans the Continental Divide and encompasses protected mountains, forests and alpine tundra. It's known for the Trail Ridge Road and the Old Fall River Road, drives that pass aspen trees and rivers.
52. Carlsbard Caverns, New Mexico
           Carlsbad Caverns National Park is in the Chihuahuan Desert of southern New Mexico. It features more than 100 caves. The Natural Entrance is a path into the namesake Carlsbad Cavern. Stalactites cling to the roof of the Big Room, a huge underground chamber in the cavern. Walnut Canyon Desert Loop is a drive with desert views. Rattlesnake Springs, a desert wetland, attracts reptiles and hundreds of bird species.
Niagara Falls, New York
53. Mystic Seaport, Connecticut
        The Museum of America and the Sea in Mystic, Connecticut is the largest maritime museum in the United States. It is notable for its collection of sailing ships and boats and for the re-creation of the crafts and fabric of an entire 19th-century seafaring village.
54. Monument Valley, Arizona & Utah
         Monument Valley, a red-sand desert region on the Arizona-Utah border, is known for the towering sandstone buttes of Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park. The park, frequently a filming location for Western movies, is accessed by the looping, 17-mile Valley Drive. The famous, steeply sloped Mittens buttes can be viewed from the road or from overlooks such as John Ford’s Point.
55. Hollywood, California
          A larger-than-life symbol of the entertainment business, Hollywood beckons tourists with landmarks like TCL Chinese Theatre and star-studded Walk of Fame. Highlights include Paramount Pictures, historic music venues like the Hollywood Bowl, and Dolby Theatre, home of the Oscars.
 
 
54. Ellis Island, New Jersey/New York
          Ellis Island is a federally owned island in New York Harbor that contains a museum and former immigration inspection station. As the United States' busiest immigrant inspection station from 1892 to 1954, it processed approximately 12 million immigrants to the country through the Port of New York and New Jersey.
55. Niagara Falls, New York
          Niagara Falls is a city on the Niagara River, in New York State. It’s known for the vast Niagara Falls, which straddle the Canadian border. In Niagara Falls State Park, the Observation Tower, at Prospect Point, juts out over Niagara Gorge for a view of all 3 waterfalls. Trails from the Niagara Gorge Discovery Center lead to other viewpoints. The Aquarium of Niagara is home to Humboldt penguins, seals and sea lions.
56. St. John, US Virgin Islands
          St. John is the smallest of the 3 U.S. Virgin Islands, which are located in the Caribbean Sea. Virgin Islands National Park occupies more than half the island. Its forests shelter resident and migratory birds, including cuckoos, warblers and hummingbirds. The mangroves at Hurricane Hole, in the east, support corals and anemones. Dolphins inhabit the island’s waters, which also host hawksbill and green turtles.
57. Santa Monica Beach, California
          Santa Monica is a coastal city west of downtown Los Angeles. Santa Monica Beach is fringed by Palisades Park, with views over the Pacific Ocean. Santa Monica Pier is home to the Pacific Park amusement park, historic Looff Hippodrome Carousel and Santa Monica Pier Aquarium. Next to the pier is Muscle Beach, an outdoor gym established in the 1930s. In the city center, Bergamot Station houses several art galleries. Santa Monica State Beach is a California State Park operated by the city of Santa Monica.
58. Vieques, Puerto Rico
          Vieques is a Caribbean island off Puerto Rico's eastern coast. It's known for boat tours of Bioluminescent Bay (or Mosquito Bay), where microorganisms give the water a blue-green glow. It also offers secluded beaches and snorkeling. Wild horses roam the countryside, much of which is preserved as the Vieques National Wildlife Refuge. The Fuerte de Vieques is a mid-19th-century Spanish fort and museum.
59. Mall of America, Minnesota
          The Mall of America (commonly, locally known as "MOA") is a shopping mall located in Bloomington, Minnesota, a suburb of the Twin Cities in Minnesota, United States. It lies southeast of the junction of Interstate 494 and Minnesota State Highway 77, north of the Minnesota River, and across the Interstate from the Minneapolis St. Paul International Airport.
60. Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
          Hawaii Volcanoes National Park is on Hawaii Island (the Big Island). At its heart are the Kīlauea and Mauna Loa active volcanoes. The Crater Rim Drive passes steam vents and the Jaggar Museum, which features volcanology exhibits and a viewpoint overlooking Halema'uma'u Crater. Thick ferns mark the entrance to the Thurston Lava Tube (Nāhuku). The Chain of Craters Road weaves over lava. Trails crisscross the park.
61. Covered Bridge, Iowa
          Cedar Bridge refers to two different bridges in Madison County, in the U.S. state of Iowa. The original Cedar Covered Bridge was built in 1883 moved in 1921, and was named to the National Register of Historic Places in 1976. The bridge was filmed in the 1995 movie The Bridges of Madison County, and destroyed by arson in 2002. The second covered Cedar Bridge was built in 2004. This second bridge was destroyed by arsonists in 2017. The bridge was again rebuilt in 2019.
62. Jesse James Farm, Kearney, Missouri
          James Brothers' House and Farm, also known as the Birthplace of Jesse James, is a historic home and farm complex located near Kearney, Clay County, Missouri. The original log section of the farmhouse was built about 1822; it was later enlarged with a wood frame addition to form a "T"-plan dwelling. The James Brothers' House is significant as the birthplace of Jesse James and Frank James and has been selected as the most important site related to the James Brothers in Missouri.
  
The Original Covered Bridge, Iowa
63.The Smithsonian Institution, DC
          The Smithsonian Institution, also known simply as the Smithsonian, is a group of museums and research centers administered by the Government of the United States. It was founded on August 10, 1846, "for the increase and diffusion of knowledge".
64. Red Clay State Park, Tennessee
         Red Clay State Historic Park is a state park located in southern Bradley County, Tennessee established in 1979. The park is also listed as an interpretive center along the Cherokee Trail of Tears. It encompasses 263 acres of land and is located just above the Tennessee-Georgia stateline.
65.The Alamo, San Antonio, Texas
         The Alamo Mission in San Antonio, commonly called The Alamo and originally known as the Misión San Antonio de Valero, is a historic Spanish mission and fortress compound founded in the 18th century by Roman Catholic missionaries in what is now San Antonio, Texas, United States.
66. Disneyworld, Florida
           The Walt Disney World Resort, also called Walt Disney World and Disney World, is an entertainment complex in Bay Lake and Lake Buena Vista, Florida, in the United States, near the cities Orlando and Kissimmee.
67. Siesta Beach, Florida 
          Siesta Key is a barrier island in the Gulf of Mexico, off the coast of Sarasota, Florida. It’s known for its sandy beaches. Siesta Beach, near the shops and cafes of Siesta Key Village, has shallow waters, a playground and tennis courts.
68. Cape Cod, Massachusetts
          Cape Cod, a hook-shaped peninsula of the U.S. state of Massachusetts, is a popular summertime destination. It's the site of quaint villages, seafood shacks, lighthouses, ponds and bay and ocean beaches. In the large town of Hyannis, the John F. Kennedy Museum is the first stop on the Kennedy Legacy Trail through downtown, where ferries depart to the resort islands of Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket.   
69. Philadelphia Art Museum
          The Philadelphia Museum of Art is an art museum originally chartered in 1876 for the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia. The main museum building was completed in 1928 on Fairmount, a hill located at the northwest end of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway at Eakins Oval.
70. Gardens of the Gods Park, Colorado
         The site is a National Natural Landmark, having been recognized by the Department of the Interior as "a nationally-significant natural area." It offers towering sandstone formations, a wonderful view of Pikes Peak, paved and unpaved hiking paths, the historic Rock Ledge Ranch Historic Site, a living history museum, placed on the National Register for Historic Places in 1971, and many other amenities.
71. Boundary Waters, Minnesota
           The Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, is a 1,090,000-acre wilderness area within the Superior National Forest in northeastern part of the US state of Minnesota under the administration of the U.S. Forest Service.
72. Charleston, South Carolina
          Charleston, the South Carolina port city founded in 1670, is defined by its cobblestone streets, horse-drawn carriages and pastel antebellum houses, particularly in the elegant French Quarter and Battery districts. Charleston is the oldest and largest city in the U.S. state of South Carolina, known for its large role in the American slave trade.
73. National Western Rodeo, Denver, Colorado  
          The National Western Stock Show has been held annually every January at the National Western Complex in Denver, Colorado since 1906. Its purpose was to demonstrate better breeding and feeding techniques to area stockmen.
74. Burning Man Festival, Nevada
           Burning Man is an event held annually in the western United States at Black Rock City, a temporary city erected in the Black Rock Desert of northwest Nevada, approximately 100 miles north-northeast of Reno, and a thriving year-round culture generated by a global community of participants.
75. Route 66
          The historic U.S. Route 66 ran east–west across the central part of the state of New Mexico, along the path now taken by Interstate 40. However, until 1937, it took a longer route via Los Lunas, Albuquerque, and Santa Fe, now roughly New Mexico State Road 6, I-25, and US 84
76.  Sedona, Arizona
          Sedona is an Arizona desert town near Flagstaff that’s surrounded by red-rock buttes, steep canyon walls and pine forests. It’s noted for its mild climate and vibrant arts community. Uptown Sedona is dense with New Age shops, spas and art galleries. On the town’s outskirts, numerous trailheads access Red Rock State Park, which offers bird-watching, hiking and picnicking spots
77. San Antonio Riverwalk, Texas
           The San Antonio River Walk is a city park and network of walkways along the banks of the San Antonio River, one story beneath the streets of San Antonio, Texas, United States.
78. Vermont Fall, Vermont
           The New England states are known for spectacular fall foliage, and Vermont, three-quarters of which is covered in forest, is perhaps the best place to see trees ablaze in reds, oranges and yellows during autumn.
79. Taos Pueblo, New Mexico
           Taos Pueblo is an ancient pueblo belonging to a Taos-speaking Native American tribe of Puebloan people. It lies about 1 mile north of the modern city of Taos, New Mexico. The pueblos are considered to be one of the oldest continuously inhabited communities in the United States.
80. Traverse City, Michigan
           Nestled on Grand Traverse Bay in Northern Michigan, is known for its beautiful beaches, festivals, restaurants and wineries.
81. Oktober Fest, Zinzinnati, Ohio
           Oktoberfest Zinzinnati is an annual weekend festival in the city of Cincinnati, Ohio. Based on the original German Oktoberfest,
82. Fall Creek Falls State Park, Tennessee
           Fall Creek Falls is a 16,181-acre natural area located within Fall Creek Falls State Park in Bledsoe and Van Buren counties. Its waterfalls, cascades, sparkling streams, gorges, forests, and cave features make it one of the most visited natural areas and state parks in the southeast. Fall Creek Falls is the highest waterfall east of the Rocky Mountains, plunging 256 feet into a shaded pool.
83. Boat Tour, Chicago, Illinois
           Catch picture-perfect views of the Chicago skyline like you've never seen it before. Come dine, dance and celebrate aboard a Spirit of Chicago cruise.
84. Appalachian Trail, Georgia/Maine
           The Appalachian National Scenic Trail, generally known as the Appalachian Trail or simply the A.T., is a marked hiking trail in the Eastern United States extending between Springer Mountain in Georgia and Mount Katahdin in Maine.
85. Philip Johnson Glass House, Connecticut
           The Glass House, or Johnson house, is a historic house museum on Ponus Ridge Road in New Canaan, Connecticut built in 1948–49. It was designed by Philip Johnson as his own residence, and "universally viewed as having been derived from" the Farnsworth House in Plano, Illinois design, according to Alice T. Friedman.
86. Williamsburg, Virginia
           Williamsburg, a city in the U.S. state of Virginia, was capital of the Virginia Colony from 1699 to 1780 and played a significant role in the American Revolution. It forms the “Historic Triangle” together with Jamestown and Yorktown. Its heart is Colonial Williamsburg, a historic district and living-history museum where actors in period costume depict daily Colonial life in the streets, stores and workshops.
87. Glacier Trek Tour, Juneau, Alaska
           Enjoy an active outdoor Juneau day trip, cruise shore excursion hiking along the shore of Mendenhall Lake and trekking across Mendenhall Glacier.
Mississippi River Boat, St. Paul, Minnesota
88. Biltmore Estate, North Carolina
           Biltmore Estate is a historic house museum and tourist attraction in Asheville, North Carolina. Biltmore House, the main residence, is a Châteauesque-style mansion built for George Washington Vanderbilt
89. Sun Road, Montana
           Going-to-the-Sun Road is a scenic mountain road in the Rocky Mountains of the western United States, in Glacier National Park in Montana.
90. Washington State Olympic National Park
           Olympic National Park is on Washington's Olympic Peninsula in the Pacific Northwest. The park sprawls across several different ecosystems, from the dramatic peaks of the Olympic Mountains to old-growth forests. The summit of glacier-clad Mt. Olympus is popular with climbers, and hiking and backpacking trails cut through the park's rainforests and along its Pacific coastline.
91. Mystic Hot Springs, Utah
           Located in the central Utah farming community of Monroe in Sevier County, the springs are part of a geothermal system within the Sevier fault, where mineral-laden water from deep within the earth trickles over rust-colored travertine domes and fills claw foot bathtubs that were allegedly salvaged from a turn-of-the-century Reno brothel.
92. Kancamagus Highway, New Hampshire
           One of the most scenic roads in America lies in the heart of the New Hampshire mountains.New Hampshire Route 112 is a 56.39-mile-long east–west state highway in northern New Hampshire. The highway winds across the state, connecting Bath to Conway through the heart of the scenic and mountainous White Mountain National Forest.
93. Millenium Park, Chicago
           Millennium Park is a public park located in the Loop community area of Chicago in Illinois operated by the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and managed by MB Real Estate.
94. Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art
           Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art welcomes all to celebrate the  power of art and architecture with the beauty of nature in Northwest Arkansas.
95. Texas State Fair
          The State Fair of Texas is an annual state fair with a controversial history held in Dallas at historic Fair Park. The fair has taken place every year since 1886 except for varying periods during World War I and World War II. It usually begins the last Friday in September and ends 24 days later
96. Kentucky Derby, Louisville, Kentucky
           The Kentucky Derby is a horse race held annually in Louisville, Kentucky, United States, on the first Saturday in May, capping the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival.
97. Gilded Age Mansions, Newport, Rhode Island
          From Colonial-era cottages oozing charm and history to waterfront Gilded Age Newport mansions that were once the summer homes of the nation’s wealthiest families.
Jessie James Farm, Kearney, Missouri
98. Harvard University, Massachusetts
           Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with about 6,800 undergraduate students and about 14,000 postgraduate students.
99. Magic Gardens, Pennsylvania
           Philadelphia's Magic Gardens is a non-profit organization, folk art environment, and gallery space on South Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. To date, it is the largest work created by mosaic artist Isaiah Zagar. The Magic Gardens spans three city lots, and includes indoor galleries and a large outdoor labyrinth.    
100. Mark Twain House, Connecticut
          The Mark Twain House and Museum in Hartford, Connecticut, was the home of Samuel Langhorne Clemens and his family from 1874 to 1891. It was designed by Edward Tuckerman Potter and built in the American High Gothic style.
101. Signature Lounge, Chicago
           Upscale spot high atop 875 North Michigan Avenue with wide views, American fare & a separate lounge.
102. National Air and Space Museum, DC
           The National Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian Institution, also called the Air and Space Museum, is a museum in Washington, D.C. It was established in 1946 as the National Air Museum and opened its main building on the National Mall near L'Enfant Plaza in 1976.
103. Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, New Mexico
           The Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta is a yearly hot air balloon festival that takes place in Albuquerque, New Mexico, during early October. The Balloon Fiesta is a nine-day event occurring in the first full week of October, and has over 500 hot air balloons each year.
Millenium Park, Chicago
104. Brooklyn Bridge, New York
           The Brooklyn Bridge is a hybrid cable-stayed/suspension bridge in New York City, spanning the East River between the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn. Opened on May 24, 1883, the Brooklyn Bridge was the first fixed crossing across the East River.
105. White Mountain National Forest, New Hampshire & Maine
           White Mountain National Forest lies within the White Mountains in the U.S. states of New Hampshire and Maine. It's crossed by the White Mountain Trail and Kancamagus scenic drives, plus part of the Appalachian Trail.
106. Alcatraz Island, San Francisco
           Alcatraz Island is located in San Francisco Bay, 1.25 miles offshore from San Francisco, California, United States. The small island was developed with facilities for a lighthouse, a military fortification, a military prison, and a federal prison from 1934 until 21 March 1963.
107. Mississippi River Cruises, Mississippi River
           Mississippi River cruise itineraries are usually separated into the Upper and Lower part of the river. The Upper Mississippi is generally considered to be between St. Louis, Missouri and St. Paul, Minnesota; and the Lower Mississippi is between Memphis, Tennessee and New Orleans, Louisiana.
108. Newport Mansions, Rhode Island
          The Newport mansions are one of Rhode Island’s greatest cultural resources, as well as one of the state’s most popular tourist attractions.
109. Mt. Rushmore, South Dakota
           Mount Rushmore National Memorial is a massive sculpture carved into Mount Rushmore in the Black Hills region of South Dakota. Completed in 1941 under the direction of Gutzon Borglum and his son Lincoln, the sculpture's roughly 60-ft.-high granite faces depict U.S. presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln. The site also features a museum with interactive exhibits.
110. Minnesota State Fair, Twin Cities
           The Minnesota State Fair is the state fair of the U.S. state of Minnesota. Its slogan is "The Great Minnesota Get-Together." It is the largest state fair in the United States by average daily attendance.
Credits: Wikipedia, National Park Services. All photographs are taken by the author.
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